So, what is the Gladiator like to drive? Well, like a truck, but also very much like a Jeep Wrangler. Jeep has done its job and done it well. The 2020 Gladiator is powered by the tried-and-true 285-horsepower 3.6-litre Pentastar V-6 and an eight-speed automatic transmission or six-speed manual. I love that Jeep decided to offer the truck with a stick.

Read more

Aside from the diesel, the Ram is available with a 3.5-litre V-6 that produces 305 horsepower and 269 pound-feet of torque. That can be temporarily increased by up to 90 pound-feet with a belt-drive 48-volt “eTorque” motor/generator. This mild-hybrid system replaces the traditional alternator and uses a lithium-ion battery to add power under hard acceleration. Optional is a 5.7-litre V-8 that delivers 395 horsepower and 410 pound-feet, and when equipped with eTorque it has slightly more towing capacity than the EcoDiesel at 5,795 kilograms.

Read more

The urban runabout was designed primarily for the youth market, but has wound up in the driveways of wider swath of buyers since its 2010-model-year launch. The Soul’s attention-getting bodywork was updated four years later and for the 2020 model year the vehicle receives a complete overhaul, including a new structure, updated content and revised powertrain choices.

Read more

The second-generation CLA is a desirable piece of eye candy and is also one of the more affordable vehicles in the Mercedes-Benz lineup. Before diving in, however, there are certain practicalities that should be considered. You see, the CLA is a bit of a head scratcher. For most buyers/lessors, the four-door car likely makes more sense than selecting some two-door model. However, the head- and leg-room-deficient rear seat in the low-slung sedan — that Mercedes-Benz insists on calling it a coupe — isn’t suitable for taller occupants.

Read more

The new 12th-generation Corolla sedan, which joins the new-for-2019 Corolla Hatchback, might not be the sharpest-looking sled on the block, or the quickest, but it’s special for other reasons. The Corolla is ideal for people who don’t want to think about how the car works, but believe it will work faithfully and safely well past the powertrain warranty stage and/or the monthly loan or lease commitment.

Read more

From the front, the Gladiator looks like any other Jeep Wrangler, with a traditional slotted vertical grille, round headlights and a stout bumper. Behind the second-row seat is a five-foot-long box that’s capable of transporting up to 730 kilograms of ATV, dirt bikes, camping gear and/or just about anything else you can imagine. Trailering capacity with the proper tow package tops out at 3,480 kilograms.

Read more

The SX Limited comes with a self-leveling rear suspension, head-up driver-information display, Nappa leather seat coverings (heated and ventilated front and second rows) and rain-sensing wipers. The second-row high-back bucket seats come only with the SX Limited model. With size, comfort and power in its favor, the Telluride checks off the boxes that most buyers of full-size utility vehicles are looking to fill. Welcome aboard.

Read more

The 2019 Toyota Corolla Hatchback might confuse some people. Although on the surface it appears to be a warmed-over version of the previous Corolla iM (originally the Scion iM), that’s just not the case. The new Hatchback’s prow shows off Toyota’s signature wide-mouth grille that’s found on a number of the automaker’s products, from the subcompact Yaris to the near-luxury Avalon. At the opposite end, the Hatchback’s more steeply raked cargo opening is made of a lightweight composite instead of steel.

Read more

There’s nothing tricky or overly dramatic about the Ranger’s cabin, just straightforward gauges and large, clearly marked dials for the audio and drive-mode controls. The centre stack has a 20-centimetre touchscreen. Ranger pricing starts at $33,100 (including destination charges) for the base XL SuperCab. Add an extra $6,400 for the XLT SuperCrew body style. The midrange XLT and top-end Lariat arrive dressed up with plenty of luxury amenities.

Read more

For the 2019 model year, the Altima has been reengineered from top to bottom. A lower hood helps slice the air better, and a dramatically different chrome-bordered grille extending to the base of the body is in perfect harmony with the rest of the radical (for a Nissan) design. The Altima’s overall dimensions aren’t significantly different from the outgoing model’s, except for a 2.5-centimetre lower roofline and a five-centimetre stretch between the front and rear wheels, which increases rear-seat legroom.

Read more